US gifts 75,000 155mm shells to Ukraine and undisclosed GMLRS amount

WASHINGTON — The United States will provide Ukraine with up to 75,000 155mm artillery shells in the coming weeks. These weapons systems are part of a new $550 million in military aid. BulgarianMilitary.com recalls that Ukraine has already exhausted its artillery rockets and projectiles of Soviet or Russian design. Kyiv currently relies solely on what the west has provided them.

Ukraine gets 155mm M982 guided shells: PBX warhead, 23-70 km range
Photo credit: Naver

The new aid package for Ukraine also includes the delivery of GMLRS missiles, which are used by Ukraine-delivered M142 HIMARS. However, the White House does not disclose the amount it sends to Ukraine.

GMLRS will end

The US is not disclosing the quantity intended to supply GMLRS to Ukraine for many reasons. One of them is extremely important and painful, although the White House refuses to admit it – stockpiles. BulgarianMilitary.com has already published the opinion of the US military, who are worried about the rapid depletion of GMLRS quantities if the White House continues to distribute them so quickly.

Currently, there are 16 HIMARS systems deployed in Ukraine. Kyiv expects four more, i.e. 20 systems in total. One system is loaded with six cartridge capsules. If each fired a full salvo twice a day, in one month Ukraine would fire 7,200 M30 or M31 missiles. According to official data, before the end of the 2021 fiscal year, the US had about 50,000 rockets available for HIMARS. However, they are part of the US Army inventory.

Ukraine received M30/M31 rockets with 51lb of PBX-109 high explosives
Photo credit: Think Defence

A few days ago, the Ukrainian president asked the US to deploy at least 100 HIMARS missile systems. This is 20% of the US armament with this type of weapon. If we assume that Ukraine’s 20 missile systems fire 7,200 missiles per month, then at the end of the 4 months, Ukraine will have used nearly 29,000 missiles. This is 58% of the stockpile before the end of the fiscal year 2021. If Ukraine receives 10 more HIMARS missile systems in full daily use, all 30 systems will have fired 43,200 missiles in four months.

$168,000 per single GMLRS

The American online portal The Drive writes that next year the Pentagon will have to pay $168,000 for each GMLRS needed by HIMARS. At present, all of these missiles are taken from existing supplies. But since the beginning of the war, and especially since the beginning of the first delivered HIMARS to Ukraine, many times more GMLRS missiles have been delivered than can be produced.

Mark Hertling draws attention to something that seems to have become a common occurrence apparently in the US after settling in Europe – the opinion that Ukraine should be given, but without considering the seriousness of the situation. “I am also relatively sure those saying “Give UKR everything it wants” are also not considering several important US national security factors,” says Hertling.

Russia showed GMLRS rockets from HIMARS, their scan is pending
Photo credit: Telegram

And last but not least, current and retired military personnel are not the only ones sounding the alarm about the possible depletion of US military stockpiles. The signal came only a few days ago. The General Accountability Office [GAO] released a report on the defense industrial base. In that report, the GAO concluded that despite years of effort, the Defense Department lacks the direction and insight to reduce the risk to the industrial base—in other words, the risk that the Pentagon will run out of bullets and weapons in a protracted, multi-front war.

***

Follow us everywhere and at any time. BulgarianMilitary.com has responsive design and you can open the page from any computer, mobile devices or web browsers. For more up-to-date news, follow our Google News, YouTube, Reddit, LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook pages. Subscribe to our Newsletter and read our stories in News360App in AppStore or GooglePlay or in FeedlyApp in AppStore or GooglePlay. Our standards: Manifesto & ethical princliples.