Subscribe to Google News

US warned that Russia will soon have the world’s most powerful nuclear cruiser

WASHINGTON, (BM) – American military analysts of the prestigious Forbes publication commented that the Russian nuclear cruiser Admiral Nakhimov is facing a serious modernization, learned BulgarianMilitary.com.

Read more: Russian missile that could upset the world’s balance of power ends with the tests

According to the publication, after the modernization, this warship of the Russian Navy may become the most dangerous ship in the world. Experts say Admiral Nakhimov will be upgraded with new weapon systems, sensor sensors and radar, which will cause the cruiser to become a threat to the seas and oceans among its military competitors in this area.

According to the author of the article, the Russian ship is more modern than its American competitors in the Iowa class. The nuclear cruiser has hypersonic missiles, a ship version of the S-300 air defense system and one of the most dangerous missiles in the world – 9K33 “Osa”.

Regarding the future armament of the warship, what is known so far, according to Russian officials, is that its weapons and striking power will be supplemented by Caliber and Onyx cruise missiles and Zircon complexes.

Zircon – a missile that can upset the world balance

As already mentioned, the Russian nuclear cruiser Admiral Nakhimov will be armed with a number of new weapon systems and missiles. One of them is the Zircon missile.

Only weeks ago, the Russian Ministry of Defense announced that it had successfully completed state tests of the Zircon missile in its naval version. According to the statement of the military department, the tests and the missile itself have confirmed their characteristics and abilities.

Read more: Top 5 best submarines in the world

It is noteworthy, however, that according to the Russian military, during the specific tests, parallel tests were performed with another new Russian weapon – the nuclear submarine / torpedo Poseidon.

If this is the case, it is likely that Russia will not reveal all the capabilities of the missile, as we know that the particular underwater drone has an autonomous mode of operation, which means that it may have a real connection with Zircon and so in the future these two weapons to be interconnected to the extent that one will command the other.

But what makes the Russian hypersonic missile so dangerous?

For now, the joint working regimes of Poseidon and Zircon are speculations. But according to Russian experts, Zircon can reach targets in the United States in about five minutes.

U.S. military experts have told reporters in the National Interest magazine that Zircon is impossible to intercept. According to them, this missile is very maneuverable and the attempt to intercept it can be compared to the possibility of one bullet hitting another bullet.

The British tabloid Daily Mirror did the same, noting that Zircon is a threat to the British Royal Navy and is capable of seriously upsetting the balance of power around the world.

In February 2019, the Russian TV presenter Dmitry Kiselev on the air of the show “Vesti Nedeli” [Sunday News – ed.] pointed out several “targets” in America to destroy them with the help of Zircons. He estimates the missiles could reach decision-making centers in the United States in less than five minutes.

Read more: Russia’s ‘nuclear monster’ is protected well, but there is still a risk of hacking

We have known for a long time that the United States does not currently have a real opportunity to oppose hypersonic missiles. They lag far behind in this area. Their hypersonic missile project failed until the moment, although it is still being developed, and it’s possible at the end of the production process the United States may have a serious supersonic weapon.

For the United States to lag behind supersonic technology, we will give as an example the fact that India has a similar missile, which is a joint production between the Russian and Indian military-industrial complexes. This is the cruise hypersonic naval missile BrahMos, which has a medium range.

More about Russian nuclear cruiser Admiral Nakhimov

The Admiral Nachimow (until 1992 Kalinin) is a cruiser of the Project 1144.2 in the Russian Navy. The ship was built for the Soviet Navy during the Cold War. After about 10 years in service, it was decommissioned in 1999 and finally slated for a major modernization that is expected to last until 2021.

In 2012, about 15 years after the ship’s decommissioning, Admiral Nakhimov was transferred from the inactive semi-trailer status (i.e. the ship had been preserved) to the repair relationship. A comprehensive modernization of the type Project 1144 to Project 1144M began, which should be completed in 2018.

Russian military experts had already puzzled at the beginning of the measure, where to get the highly qualified personnel to man the ship. The cost of modernization was estimated at up to 1.24 billion euros in 2012.

Read more: Russian Navy ships could be armed with guided artillery missiles

The conversion will be carried out in the Sewmasch shipyard. Among other things, the launch tubes for the P-700 granite guided missiles were removed from the ship’s hull. Instead of these, ten vertical take-off systems for missiles of the 3S14 type are to be installed. In total, up to 80 guided missiles of the typeskal, Oniks and Tsirkon can be carried.

Since the deadline for the announced recommissioning in 2018 could not be met due to delays, the renewed commissioning is now (as of 2018) not expected until 2021

***

Follow us everywhere and at any time. BulgarianMilitary.com has responsive design and you can open the page from any computer, mobile devices or web browsers. For more up-to-date news from us, follow our YouTube, Reddit, LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook pages. Do not miss the chance to subscribe to our newsletter. Subscribe and read our stories in News360App in AppStore or GooglePlay or in FeedlyApp in AppStore or GooglePlay.

Subscribe to Google News.

>>Be a reporter: Write and send your article.<<

BulgarianMilitary.com
Editorial team

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More