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Erdogan threatened Greece with a bloody campaign like those in Iraq, Syria, and Libya

ANKARA, (BM) – Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan made new provocative statements today and threatened Greece that Athens “will pay a heavy price if Greeks attack Oruc Reis”, learned BulgarianMilitary.com, citing Greek news agency Pentapostagma.

Read more: Egypt warns Turkey: We’re military power, and Greece is important

Speaking about the situation in the Eastern Mediterranean, he stressed: “We told them to dare to attack Oruts Reyes, otherwise you will pay a heavy price. Today, they got the first answer”, but did not specify exactly what he means.

In his second speech today, Turkey’s President continued to hurl threats against Greece, said a new, tough, bloody campaign will be pursued, cited Turkish military entanglement in Iraq, Syria & Libya as Turkish response, and claimed his gov’t is under economic attack.

In recent days, there has been a crescendo of statements, extremely provocative by Turkish officials.

These inflammatory statements come while he has given an “angelic” face after the phone call with Angela Merkel, referring to dialogue and international law. Rather, the Turkish president means international law as Turkey has it in mind.

As we reported earlier today, the Greek frigate F451 Limnos collided with the Turkish ship F247 Kemal Reis in the Mediterranean.

According to the portal, the Turkish frigate was damaged. Armyvoice.gr notes that the collision could have been the result of maneuvering in a small space in the disputed area.

The General Staff of the National Defense of Greece (GEETHA) denied the information about the clash.

Read more: Turkey threatens Greece with missile fire, military helicopters in dangerous proximity

Armyvoice.gr notes that information about the incident appeared shortly after the previous naval conflict: earlier, a Turkish warship dangerously approached the Greek frigate Νικηφόρος Φωκά.

As BulgarianMilitary.com reported, relations between Greece and Turkey have worsened due to Ankara’s plans to explore for gas and oil in the Aegean Sea. The Greek authorities have complained to the EU authorities about Turkey’s “provocative and illegal” behavior in the Eastern Mediterranean.

Later, French President Emmanuel Macron announced his decision to temporarily strengthen the French military presence in the Eastern Mediterranean. He said that the military would be sent to assess the situation in the area and monitor compliance with international law.

Turkey threatens Greece with missile fire

As we reported on August 11, a Greek helicopter was harassed early on Tuesday afternoon by three Turks in Kastelorizo, citing local news agency. According to the agency the Greek helicopter transported supplies and departed from Kastelorizo ​​to Rhodes.

The Turkish press also refers to Oruç Reis aerial shield with reference to the Atmaca missiles, emphasizing at the same time a barrage of flights of Turkish unmanned vehicles on the coasts of Asia Minor, near Chios and recently it became known that a Turkish UAV was flying near Rhodes.

“Turkish UAVs provide control of the airspace of the search area, something that causes anger in Greece” Turkish sources said.

Read more: Turkey has developed a plan for an attack and military invasion of Greece

“Thanks to our Atmaca anti-ship missile, which was put into operation this year, the Greek side will not be able to target our vessels without retaliation in the SE Mediterranean”, Turkish sources emphasize.

The same sources also state that “any possible transfer of Greek troops by ships will be prevented by Atmaca missiles at a distance of 200 kilometers”.

While they emphasize that Oruç Reis has started research activities in the declared area, as the control of the airspace of the area is provided by Turkish unmanned vehicles.

Their purpose is to create an air shield on the ship, while the Oruç Reis has clearly “laid out” cables and is conducting research on an agenda.

In a statement on its Twitter account, the Turkish Ministry said that seismic activity had begun in the maritime jurisdiction of Turkey’s eastern Mediterranean, accompanied by surface units provided by the Turkish Navy.

Egypt warned Turkey: We’re military power, and Greece is important

Egypt and Greece signed a maritime demarcation agreement last week in a development that has broad economic and mainly geopolitical and defense significance,” a major Cairo newspaper reported on August 12.

More than a dozen rounds of negotiations took place before the signing of the agreement demarcating the maritime border between Egypt and Greece on August 6, which defines the exclusive economic zone (EEZ) between the two countries.

Read more: Allies conflict: Greece deployed tanks and defense systems along the border with Turkey

“The agreement is important for Greece and Egypt,” explained Egyptian oil expert Ramad Aboul-Ella.

“It could also mean exploiting new gas fields, after the Zohr one that was discovered in 2015. This is particularly important as there are those who want to ‘soil’ our financial waters,” Abul-Ela said. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan who “wants to stick his nose where it does not belong” underlines.

“First, he [Erdogan – ed.] is an invader in northern Syria and Iraq and now he is pirate in the Mediterranean,” he said, echoing the general view that prevails in Egypt about R.T. Erdogan.

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