Subscribe to Google News

Pratt & Whitney Received a $2 Billion F135 Delivery Contract

EAST HARTFORD (Connecticut, United States), June 4, 2018, Author: Galina Zdravkova, Photo: Pratt & Whitney (Pratt and WhitneyF135s-on-production-line)

On May 31, 2018 Pratt & Whitney announced that it has received a $2 billion contract from the U.S. Department of Defense to deliver 135 of its F135 turbofan engines for powering the F-35 Lightning II aircrafts. The contract also involves programme management, engineering and production support, spare modules and spare parts and covers all three variants of the F-35s – the Conventional Takeoff and Landing (CTOL), the Carrier Variant (CV) and the Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing (STOVL).

Pratt & Whitney is a division of United Technologies Corp. and a world leader in the design, manufacture and service of aircraft engines and auxiliary power units.

In connection with the newly received contract, the F-35 Program Executive Officer, Vice Admiral Mat Winter, said, “This agreement for the next lot of F135 engines represents a fair deal for the U.S. Government, the international partnership and industry. Affordability is our number one priority, and by working together, we are making steady progress in reducing F-35 propulsion costs.”

And the Vice President, Pratt & Whitney, F135 Program, John Wiedemer, added, “Pratt & Whitney and our supply chain remain committed to continual cost reduction for the F135 engine and to providing a superior product at the best value for our U.S. and international customers. Since 2009, we have reduced the production cost of the F135 by more than half and are now pursuing additional affordability initiatives to drive down engine production and sustainment costs even further throughout the F-35’s planned lifecycle.”

The F135 propulsion system is an afterburning turbofan designed especially for the F-35 Lightning II single-engine strike fighter of Lockheed Martin.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More